Gettysburg Republican Banner - December 9, 1834

The total eclipse of November 30, 1834, swept down into the U.S. from western Canada and crossed over a wide swath of territories and states before exiting the country in South Carolina and Georgia. In Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, it was only an 88 percent partial eclipse, but it apparently made quite an impression on the author of an article that appeared in the Gettysburg Republican Banner on December 9. The writer dedicates nearly half of his column to reflections about the "triumphs of science over ignorance and superstition" and "how wonderful a proof is this of the uniformity of the laws of nature." Interestingly, he refers to "Herschel," which the planet Uranus was then known as. Finally, readers learn about the eclipse itself, which was observed locally in clear skies and resulted in a remarkable drop in temperature of as much as 28 degrees!

(Any information about eclipse viewing procedures provided in historical articles should be considered unsafe)

Gettsburg Republican Banner - December 9, 1834

Gettsburg Republican Banner - December 9, 1834

(Any information about eclipse viewing procedures provided in historical articles should be considered unsafe)


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